It’s been a long while since I read a Dresden Files book, and I was quite looking forward to it. While I’ve been really enjoying the stuff that I’ve gotten from TBRindr, it’ll be nice to get to a book that I’ve chosen for myself that I actually finish now.

Proven Guilty starts with Harry attending an execution as part of his duties as a Warden of the White Council, a situation that disgusts him whilst still being the necessary course of action. Whilst in attendance, he is given two tasks by members of the Council. First, by his former master Ebenezer McCoy, he is asked to look into why the Sidhe aren’t reacting to Red Court vampires trespassing in their territory during raids on the White Council. Second, by the mysterious Gatekeeper, who gives him a general hint to look out for black magic. Whilst looking into these, he is dragged into looking after his friend Michael’s daughter, Molly, while she is at a horror movie convention and perhaps persuading her and her mother to make up after a series of blazing, teenage-rebellion-fuelled rows. But Molly may have some link to the black magic, as a series of magical attacks start befalling the convention attendees.
As you can probably tell by the time it took to finish Proven Guilty, this one was a bit of a slow start for me. This is most probably not entirely down to the book, but also down to the time since my last foray into the Dresden Files. It took me a little while to get back into that mindset and remember what factions are in play, who is feuding with who, and how many of them want Harry’s guts for garters. At the eighth entry, the Dresden Files is a fairly complex series which, judging by some of the conclusions reached at the end of Proven Guilty, is only going to get more complicated. Not necessarily a bad thing, but it can be a lot to take on initially. By the end I was absolutely devouring it, so it’s certainly not a huge impediment.
So there are two big changes, both to previously established characters. First of all, and most prominently, is Molly, the daughter of my least favourite character Michael Carpenter. Whereas in previous entries she was an adorably precocious and cheeky pre-teen, she’s almost grown up now. And boy did she hit the teenage rebellion button like it had personally offended her. She’s now pierced and tattooed in places her parents would rather she hadn’t discovered, with hair dyed in shades of cotton candy, having also dropped out of school and hanging around with the wrong crowd. It’s an entertaining shift to say the least, and not entirely surprising given the oh-so-holy nature of the family before now. It was, however, the second change in character that caught me more off-guard and I was really pleasantly surprised. Charity, Michael’s wife, had up to this point been more of an annoyance than anything, providing little more than unprovoked aggression towards Harry for little things like breathing and existing. Well, turns out that she had a reason and goddamn if it doesn’t make you reconsider all her behaviour until now. And she gets a chance to kick ass and take names, nailing it with far more aplomb than I could have expected.

After seven entries, there is a lot to remind yourself of when you start Proven Guilty, but it shouldn’t be a big issue. The stars of this entry into the series are Molly and Charity, who outshine Michael by absolute leagues. And the hint of something much bigger in the background is intriguing. 4.5/5

Next review: The Blighted City by Scott Kaelen

Signing off,
Nisa.